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Roman Thrace: Battle of Adrianople, Antonia Tryphaena, Via Egnatia, Traianoupoli, Dorotheus of Tyre, Gate of Trajan, Phlegon of Marathon Books LLC

Roman Thrace: Battle of Adrianople, Antonia Tryphaena, Via Egnatia, Traianoupoli, Dorotheus of Tyre, Gate of Trajan, Phlegon of Marathon

Books LLC

Published July 27th 2011
ISBN : 9781157673750
Paperback
58 pages
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 34. Chapters: Roman-era Thracians, Roman towns and cities in Bulgaria, Battle of Adrianople, Leo I the Thracian,MorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 34. Chapters: Roman-era Thracians, Roman towns and cities in Bulgaria, Battle of Adrianople, Leo I the Thracian, Sozopol, Spartacus, Bouzes, Maximinus Thrax, Vitalian, Antonia Tryphaena, Novae, Phaedrus, Via Egnatia, Oescus, Nicopolis ad Istrum, Ratiaria, Nicopolis ad Nestum, Marcianopolis, John Mystacon, Traianoupoli, Obzor, Via Militaris, Dorotheus of Tyre, Gate of Trajan, Rhodope, Aedava, Diocese of Thrace, Phlegon of Marathon, Coutzes, Battle of Philippopolis, Kabyle, Thraex, Diocletianopolis in Thracia, Paroecopolis, Storgosia, Titus Julius Priscus, Via Pontica, Abritus. Excerpt: Spartacus (Greek: Latin: ) (c. 109 BC - 71 BC) was a famous leader of the slaves in the Third Servile War, a major slave uprising against the Roman Republic. Little is known about Spartacus beyond the events of the war, and surviving historical accounts are sometimes contradictory and may not always be reliable. He was an accomplished military leader. Spartacus struggle, often seen as oppressed people fighting for their freedom against a slave-owning aristocracy, has found new meaning for modern writers since the 19th century. The rebellion of Spartacus has proven inspirational to many modern literary and political writers, making Spartacus a folk hero among cultures both ancient and modern. Balkan tribes, including the MaediThe ancient sources agree that Spartacus was a Thracian. Plutarch describes him as a Thracian of Nomadic stock. Appian says he was a Thracian by birth, who had once served as a soldier with the Romans, but had since been a prisoner and sold for a Gladiator. Florus (2.8.8) described him as one who from Thracian mercenary, had become a Roman soldier, of a soldier a deserter and robber, and afterwards, from consideration of his strength, a gladiator. Some authors refer to the Thracian tribe of the Maedi, which in historic ...